Report on Plans and Priorities 2014-15

ISSN 2292-4973

Report on Plans and Priorities 2014-15 (PDF Version, 507 kb)

2014-15 Estimates

Part III – Departmental Expenditure Plans: Reports on Plans and Priorities

Purpose

Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) are individual expenditure plans for each department and agency. These reports provide increased levels of detail over a three-year period on an organization's main priorities by strategic outcome, program and planned/expected results, including links to related resource requirements presented in the Main Estimates. In conjunction with the Main Estimates, Reports on Plans and Priorities serve to inform members of Parliament on planned expenditures of departments and agencies, and support Parliament's consideration of supply bills. The RPPs are typically tabled soon after the Main Estimates by the President of the Treasury Board.

Estimates Documents

The Estimates are comprised of three parts:

Part I – Government Expenditure Plan – provides an overview of the Government's requirements and changes in estimated expenditures from previous fiscal years.

Part II – Main Estimates – supports the appropriation acts with detailed information on the estimated spending and authorities being sought by each federal organization requesting appropriations.

In accordance with Standing Orders of the House of Commons, Parts I and II must be tabled on or before March 1.

Part III – Departmental Expenditure Plans – consists of two components:

DPRs are individual department and agency accounts of results achieved against planned performance expectations as set out in respective RPPs.

The DPRs for the most recently completed fiscal year are tabled in the fall by the President of the Treasury Board.

Supplementary Estimates support Appropriation Acts presented later in the fiscal year. Supplementary Estimates present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or have subsequently been refined to account for developments in particular programs and services. Supplementary Estimates also provide information on changes to expenditure forecasts of major statutory items as well as on such items as: transfers of funds between votes; debt deletion; loan guarantees; and new or increased grants.

For more information on the Estimates, please consult the Treasury Board Secretariat Web site. Footnote i

Links to the Estimates

As shown above, RPPs make up part of the Part III of the Estimates documents. Whereas Part II emphasizes the financial aspect of the Estimates, Part III focuses on financial and non-financial performance information, both from a planning and priorities standpoint (RPP), and an achievements and results perspective (DPR).

The Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) establishes a structure for display of financial information in the Estimates and reporting to Parliament via RPPs and DPRs. When displaying planned spending, RPPs rely on the Estimates as a basic source of financial information.

Main Estimates expenditure figures are based on the Annual Reference Level Update which is prepared in the fall. In comparison, planned spending found in RPPs includes the Estimates as well as any other amounts that have been approved through a Treasury Board submission up to February 1 (see Definitions section). This readjusting of the financial figures allows for a more up-to-date portrait of planned spending by program.

Changes to the presentation of the Report on Plans and Priorities

Several changes have been made to the presentation of the RPP partially to respond to a number of requests – from the House of Commons Standing Committees on Public Accounts (PACReport 15 Footnote ii, in 2010; and on Government and Operations Estimates (OGGOReport 7 Footnote iii, in 2012 – to provide more detailed financial and non-financial performance information about programs within RPPs and DPRs, thus improving the ease of their study to support appropriations approval.

How to read this document

RPPs are divided into four sections:

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

This Organizational Expenditure Overview allows the reader to get a general glance at the organization. It provides a description of the organization's purpose, as well as basic financial and human resources information. This section opens with the new Organizational Profile, which displays general information about the department, including the names of the minister and the deputy head, the ministerial portfolio, the year the department was established, and the main legislative authorities. This subsection is followed by a new subsection entitled Organizational Context, which includes the Raison d'être, the Responsibilities, the Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture, the Organizational Priorities and the Risk Analysis. This section ends with the Planned Expenditures, the Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes, the Estimates by Votes and the Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. It should be noted that this section does not display any non-financial performance information related to programs (please see Section II).

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome(s)

This Section provides detailed financial and non-financial performance information for strategic outcomes, programs and sub-programs. This section allows the reader to learn more about programs by reading their respective description and narrative entitled "Planning Highlights." This narrative speaks to key services or initiatives which support the plans and priorities presented in Section I; it also describes how performance information supports the department's strategic outcome or parent program.

Section III: Supplementary Information

This section provides supporting information related to departmental plans and priorities. In this section, the reader will find future-oriented statement of operations and a link to supplementary information tables regarding transfer payments, as well as information related to the greening government operations, internal audits and evaluations, horizontal initiatives, user fees, major crown and transformational projects, and up-front multi-year funding, where applicable to individual organizations. The reader will also find a link to the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication, produced annually by the Minister of Finance, which provides estimates and projections of the revenue impacts of federal tax measures designed to support the economic and social priorities of the Government of Canada.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

In this last section, the reader will have access to organizational contact information.

Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary Vs.Non-budgetary Expenditures
Budgetary expenditures – operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to crown corporations. Non-budgetary expenditures – net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Expected Result
An outcome that a program is designed to achieve.

Full-Time Equivalent (FTE)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. FTEs are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada Outcomes
A set of high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole.

Management Resources and Results Structure (MRRS)
A common approach and structure to the collection, management and reporting of financial and non-financial performance information.

An MRRS provides detailed information on all departmental programs (e.g.: program costs, program expected results and their associated targets, how they align to the government's priorities and intended outcomes, etc.) and establishes the same structure for both internal decision making and external accountability.

Planned Spending
For the purpose of the RPP, planned spending refers to those amounts for which a Treasury Board (TB) submission approval has been received by no later than February 1, 2014. This cut-off date differs from the Main Estimates process. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditure levels presented in the 2014-15 Main Estimates.

Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of a department's programs, where programs are arranged in a hierarchical manner to depict the logical relationship between each program and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Spending Areas
Government of Canada categories of expenditures. There are four spending areasFootnote iv (social affairs, economic affairs, international affairs and government affairs) each comprised of three to five Government of Canada outcomes.

Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the department's mandate, vision, and core functions.

Sunset Program
A time-limited program that does not have ongoing funding or policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made as to whether to continue the program. (In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.)

Whole-of-Government Framework
A map of the financial and non-financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations that aligns their programs to a set of high level outcome areas defined for the government as a whole.

Table of Contents


Minister's Message

The Honourable Tony Clement

As the minister responsible for the Canada School of Public Service (the School), I am pleased to present the School's 2014-15 Report on Plans and Priorities.

The School provides learning and training opportunities that enhance knowledge, skills and competencies to support an innovative and high-performing federal public service.

In the 2014-15 fiscal year, the School will focus on offering modernized, accessible and cost-effective learning activities and tools, including online delivery, that support productivity and high performance in the public service.

For more information about the activities and offerings the School provides to public service employees, please visit the organization's Web site.





Original version signed by:

The Honourable Tony Clement
President of the Treasury Board


Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: Tony Clement

Deputy head: Linda Lizotte-MacPherson

Ministerial portfolio: Treasury Board

Year established: 2004

Main legislative authorities: Canada School of Public Service Act, S.C. 1991, c. 16

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

The Canada School of Public Service (the School) is the common learning service provider for the Public Service of Canada. The School has a legislative mandate to provide a range of learning activities to build individual and organizational capacity and management excellence within the public service.

The School has one strategic goal: to ensure that public servants have the common knowledge and leadership and management competencies required to effectively serve Canada and Canadians.

Responsibilities

Established on April 1, 2004, under the Public Service Modernization Act Endnote v and operating under the authority of the Canada School of Public Service Act Endnotevi (CSPS Act), the School's primary responsibility is to provide a wide range of learning opportunities and develop a learning culture within the public service. The School has a direct effect on service to Canadians by contributing to the skills development of public service employees and the effectiveness of public service organizations.

The School, a departmental corporation, is mandated under the CSPS Act to

The School's program priorities are geared to delivering results in accordance with the Treasury Board's Policy on Learning, Training and Development, Endnotevii which came into effect on January 1, 2006. This policy highlights the value of learning, with particular emphasis on required training and the importance of creating a learning culture within the public service.

The School supports deputy head accountabilities with respect to leadership and professional development across the public service by identifying organizational needs and designing and delivering high-quality, practical programs that address the key development requirements of public service employees.

The School is a common service organization under the Treasury Board's Common Services Policy, Endnoteviii and its curriculum is designed to support public service accountabilities and leadership competencies and respond to government priorities. As an optional service provider, the School responds to the needs of the public service in the most efficient and effective manner possible.

The School's direction and planning is informed by a committee of deputy ministers appointed by the Clerk of the Privy Council. Established in 2012-13, the Canada School of Public Service Advisory Committee Endnoteix provides a forum for ongoing consultation, collaboration and discussion of the School's strategic agenda and emerging public service-wide learning priorities.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

1  Strategic Outcome: "Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians."

Organizational Priorities

Organizational Priorities. This table is divided into two parts. The first part is split into three columns, which are, from left to right: Priority, Type and Strategic Outcome and Programs. The second half of the table provides the description of the priority with the following two questions: Why is this a priority? What are the plans for meeting this priority?
Priority Type Endnote1 Strategic Outcome and Programs
A relevant curriculum that meets the needs of public service organizations and employees New Strategic Outcome: Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

  1. Program: Foundational Learning
  2. Program:Organizational Leadership Development
  3. Program:Public Sector Management Innovation
Description
Why is this a priority?

The School is mandated to assist deputy heads in meeting the learning needs of their organizations and to provide public service employees with the learning opportunities they need to do their jobs effectively. This priority aims to support the public service in pursuit of performance excellence, accessibility and innovation.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

Plans for meeting this priority include the following:
  • Formulate and provide a common curriculum designed to build the knowledge, skills and competencies required at key stages of a public service career.
  • Advance key initiatives in support of government-wide priorities through collaboration with central agency partners, departments and agencies.
  • Contribute to the ongoing renewal of the public service by supporting activities related to Blueprint 2020, Endnotex a vision for the future of the federal public service.
  • Modernize learning through technology-supported delivery, innovative programs and creative approaches to collaboration and networking across the public service.
Organizational Priorities. This table is divided into two parts. The first part is split into three columns, which are, from left to right: Priority, Type and Strategic Outcome and Programs. The second half of the table provides the description of the priority with the following two questions: Why is this a priority? What are the plans for meeting this priority?
Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Programs
Organizational Renewal New Strategic Outcome: Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

  1. Program: Foundational Learning
  2. Program:Organizational Leadership Development
  3. Program:Public Sector Management Innovation
  4. Program:Internal Services
Description
Why is this a priority?

This priority reflects the School's efforts to redefine how it supports public service excellence while ensuring that learning is delivered in a cost-effective and accessible manner.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

Plans for meeting this priority include the following:
  • Through the School's Strategic Directions initiative, establish a plan to ensure that, as a learning institution, the School continuously adapts and adjusts to better serve the evolving learning needs of the public service.
  • Align internal planning to strengthen the School's operations, processes and practices to ensure sound stewardship and to deliver results.
  • Promote employee engagement to foster innovation and collaboration at the School in support of a dynamic workforce and a healthy workplace.

Risk Analysis

Key Risks
Risk Analysis: Key Risks. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: Risk, Risk Response Strategy and Link to Program Alignment Architecture.
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Relevance of the Curriculum and Delivery of Products and Services – Risk that the School's curriculum offerings will not be relevant and align with government priorities and clients' needs and expectations for content and/or delivery. The School is undertaking a comprehensive Strategic Directions exercise to establish a long-term business model that includes alignment of curriculum with government priorities and meeting clients' expectations for improved accessibility to learning products. Strategic Outcome:
Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

Programs:
Foundational Learning

Organizational Leadership Development

Public Sector Management Innovation
Market Share and Revenue Generation – Risk that the School's market share and revenue generation will not be sufficient to sustain the School's operations and/or future development of products and services. The School will improve client engagement and outreach through active participation in departmental learning forums, streamlined business processes and targeted and timely learning notifications through e-mails, e-newsletter, social media and event marketing. Strategic Outcome:
Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

Programs:
Foundational Learning

Organizational Leadership Development

Public Sector Management Innovation
Information Management and Technology – Risk that the School will not have the required technology to deliver its products and services. The School is developing a strategy for the design and implementation of an e-School, improved communications with learners through social media tools and information technology ever-greening. Strategic Outcome:
Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

Programs:
Foundational Learning

Organizational Leadership Development

Public Sector Management Innovation

Internal Services

The School updates its environmental scan annually to inform decision making and to establish a foundation for the School's priorities. Ongoing fiscal restraint affects the School through direct reductions in appropriated funding, a reduced number of learners and smaller available departmental training budgets. In this environment, client departments are seeking greater value for their limited training dollars, and learners expect better access to online courses. To effectively manage risks associated with these environmental factors, the School has undertaken a comprehensive Strategic Directions exercise. The expected result is that the School will be in a better position to plan and invest in its curriculum and delivery methods to remain relevant and aligned with government priorities and meet clients' expectations.

The School operates in a competitive training environment. Market share and sufficient revenue generation are critical success factors to sustain the School's operations and the future development of products and services. The School is placing greater focus on articulating and promoting the value of its curriculum and services that demonstrate clear value to the public service. It is also implementing a strategic marketing approach to improve engagement and relationship building at all levels with client organizations.

The evolution of new technology, combined with client expectations of increased access to learning materials online and through mobile devices, presents both opportunities and risks. In collaboration with Shared Services Canada, the School will work to improve and make better use of its information technology infrastructure and learning methods to enrich its online courses and improve access.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending – dollars)

Planned Expenditures: Budgetary Financial Resources (Planned Spending in dollars). The table is divided into four columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Main Estimates, 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending, and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
85,490,028 85,490,028 85,193,019 84,814,773

Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])

Planned Expenditures: Human Resources (full time equivalents). The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
600 590 580

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Programs (dollars)

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome and Program(s) in dollars. The School's strategic outcome, programs and internal services are in the first column, which is divided into seven rows. Read down the first row for the explanation of the strategic outcome. The next three rows are the following: Foundational Learning, Organizational Leadership Development and Public Sector Management Innovation. Select a program and then read to the right for the 2011-12 expenditures, 2012-13 expenditures, 2013-14 forecast spending, 2014-15 Main Estimates, 2014-15 planned spending, 2015-16 planned spending, and 2016-17 planned spending. The last three rows of the table present the strategic outcome total, the internal services subtotal and the total.
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services 2011-12
Expenditures
2012-13
Expenditures
2013-14
Forecast Spending
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.
1.1 Foundational Learning 74,698,736 48,891,757 52,234,154 41,636,392 41,636,392 41,639,728 41,645,313
1.2 Organizational Leadership Development 12,713,243 8,482,246 9,157,229 10,686,736 10,686,736 10,687,592 10,689,026
1.3 Public Sector Management Innovation 8,442,790 9,499,141 8,254,397 9,248,810 9,248,810 9,249,550 9,250,791
Strategic Outcome Subtotal 95,854,769 66,873,144 69,645,780 61,571,938 61,571,938 61,576,870 61,585,130
Internal Services Subtotal 30,086,057 30,392,083 25,009,666 23,918,090 23,918,090 23,616,149 23,229,643
Total 125,940,826 97,265,227 94,655,446 85,490,028 85,490,028 85,193,019 84,814,773

Since 2011-12, the School has successfully managed costs and achieved significant expenditure reductions. Major contributing factors include the following:

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes

2014-15 Planned Spending by Whole-of-Government-Framework Spending Area (dollars)

Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes: 2014-15 Planned Spending by Whole of Government Framework Spending Area in dollars. The School's strategic outcome is in the first column. The second column is divided into three rows and presents the School's programs: Foundational Learning, Organizational Leadership Development and Public Sector Management Innovation. Select a program and then read to the right for the spending area, Government of Canada outcome, and 2014-15 planned spending.
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014-15 Planned Spending
Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians. 1.1 Foundational Learning Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 41,636,392
1.2 Organizational Leadership Development Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 10,686,736
1.3 Public Sector Management Innovation Government Affairs Well-managed and efficient government operations 9,248,810

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Total Spending by Spending Area in dollars. The table is divided into two columns, which are, from left to right: Spending Area and Total Planned Spending.
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Government Affairs 61,571,938

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

  • Departmental Spending Trend Graph

  • Alternative Text for Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Estimates by Vote

For information on the School's organizational appropriations, please see the 2014-15 Main Estimates publication. Endnotexi

Strategic Environmental Assessment

The School ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) goals and targets through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, demonstrating that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Public servants have the common knowledge and the leadership and management competencies they require to fulfill their responsibilities in serving Canadians.

Performance Measurement

Performance Measurement. The table is divided into three columns. Read down the first column for performance indicators. Read down the second column for targets. Read down the third column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Percentage of participants assessed who experience a change in behaviour "on the job" For the courses that were assessed, 60 percent of participants Three-year cycle
Percentage of courses assessed that result in participant knowledge gain 100 percent of courses assessed Three-year cycle
Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Program 1.1: Foundational Learning

Description: Through this program, the School contributes to building a professional workforce by providing foundational learning activities that are aligned with public service management priorities and designed in accordance with Treasury Board's Policy on Learning, Training and Development and associated knowledge standards. Four sub-programs support this program:

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 1.1: Foundational Learning

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Program 1.1: Foundational Learning. The table is divided into four columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Main Estimates, 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending, and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
41,636,392 41,636,392 41,639,728 41,645,313

Human Resources (FTEs) – Program 1.1 Foundational Learning

Human Resources (FTEs) - Program 1.1 Foundational Learning. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
288 282 280

Performance Measurement – Program 1.1: Foundational Learning

Performance Measurement - Program 1.1: Foundational Learning. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Knowledge is acquired through participation in the School's Foundational Learning courses Percentage of courses assessed that result in participant knowledge gain 100 percent of courses assessed Three-year cycle
Participants are satisfied with the School's Foundational Learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Foundational Learning program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:

  • Continue to provide learning solutions to support whole-of-government initiatives. For example, the School contributes to the Open Government initiative Endnotexii through a suite of offerings on GCDOCS, the Government of Canada's enterprise-wide content management tool.
  • Expand the use of technology to offer more responsive, cost-effective and accessible delivery of learning across the country.

Sub-program 1.1.1: Required Training

Description: The School, through its Required Training sub-program, ensures that public service employees meet required knowledge standards and supports public servants' accountability through the provision of training in values and ethics, governance and accountability.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.1.1: Required Training

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.1.1: Required Training. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
6,253,797 6,254,298 6,255,137

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.1.1: Required Training

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.1.1: Required Training. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
41 40 40

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.1.1: Required Training

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.1.1: Required Training. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved."
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Required Training learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Required Training sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:

  • As the Treasury Board Directive on Performance ManagementEndnotexiii comes into effect on April 1, 2014, the School will continue to support organizations through its Performance Management curriculum.
  • Update required training for new employees and new managers and executives with delegated authority to improve accessibility and support modern learning approaches.

Sub-program 1.1.2: Professional Development Training

Description: The School, through its Professional Development sub-program, provides public service employees with learning services to improve their knowledge, skills and competencies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.1.2: Professional Development Training

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.1.2: Professional Development Training. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
26,703,111 26,705,251 26,708,833

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.1.2: Professional Development Training

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.1.2: Professional Development Training. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
177 173 173

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.1.2: Professional Development Training

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.1.2: Professional Development Training. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance
Indicators
Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Professional Development Training learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Professional Development Training sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:

  • Work with lead security agencies to increase access to security-related training within the public service, including an online awareness course for all public service employees.

Sub-program 1.1.3: Official Languages Learning

Description: The School, through its Official Languages Learning sub-program, facilitates a coordinated approach to language training services for departments in addition to developing and offering online language tools that public service employees can use to maintain proficiency in their second language.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.1.3: Official Languages Learning

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.1.3: Official Languages Learning. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
6,609,615 6,610,144 6,611,031

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.1.3: Official Languages Learning

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.1.3: Official Languages Learning. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
61 60 58

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.1.3: Official Languages Learning

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.1.3: Official Languages Learning. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants have the online tools to support the maintenance of their second official language Number of online tools 50 End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Official Languages Learning sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:
  • Continue to act as a technical authority, set standards and monitor the quality of training provided by pre-qualified suppliers of language training services.
  • Work with Public Works and Government Services Canada towards harmonizing all language training access through national and regional master standing offers.
  • Continue to support public service employees in the development of their learning plans with respect to official languages.

Sub-program 1.1.4: Online Learning

Description: Through its Online Learning sub-program, the School makes learning more accessible and efficient. As with classroom courses, online learning products are designed to enhance public service employees' knowledge, skills and competencies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.1.4: Online Learning

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.1.4: Online Learning. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2,069,869 2,070,035 2,070,312

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.1.4: Online Learning

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.1.4: Online Learning. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
9 9 9

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.1.4: Online Learning

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.1.4: Online Learning. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants have access to the online tools and learning products to support their learning Number of online accesses 70,000 End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Online Learning sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:
  • Increase the number of online offerings and collaborative delivery arrangements.
  • Modernize learning through the use of technologies (e.g. virtual classrooms and webinars).
  • Ensure that faculty members are well equipped to deliver learning using new technology.

Program 1.2: Organizational Leadership Development

Description: The School, through its Organizational Leadership Development program, strengthens public service leadership capacity and contributes to public service renewal by supporting existing and emerging leaders with targeted leadership learning activities, seminars and events. Three sub-programs support this program:

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 1.2: Organizational Leadership Development

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Program 1.2: Organizational Leadership Development. The table is divided into four columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Main Estimates, 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
10,686,736 10,686,736 10,687,592 10,689,026

Human Resources (FTEs) – Program 1.2: Organizational Leadership Development

Human Resources (FTEs) - Program 1.2: Organizational Leadership Development. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
55 55 54

Performance Measurement – Program 1.2: Organizational Leadership Development

Performance Measurement - Program 1.2: Organizational Leadership Development. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are able to apply their Organizational Leadership Development training "on the job" Percentage of participants assessed who experience a change in behaviour "on the job" For the courses that were assessed, 60 percent of participants Three-year cycle
Participants are satisfied with the School's Organizational Leadership Development learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Organizational Leadership Development program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:
  • Offer flexible leadership learning programs designed to support evolving government priorities.
  • Provide interactive, community-based leadership learning activities to support organizations in the management of change, performance and innovation.
  • Continue to incorporate experiential learning approaches into the School's leadership and management curriculum to support on-the-job applicability.
  • Launch the School's Faculty Strategy to build instructor capacity by leveraging existing knowledge and expertise from both the public and private sectors.
  • Introduce a new curriculum for new managers to support and equip them with the common knowledge, skills and competencies required to perform effectively in their new role.

Sub-program 1.2.1: Leadership Competencies

Description: The School, through its Leadership Competencies sub-program, ensures that current and future leaders in the public service are equipped with the leadership competencies required to deliver results and lead change within their departments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.2.1: Leadership Competencies

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.2.1: Leadership Competencies. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
2,900,000 2,900,232 2,900,621

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.2.1: Leadership Competencies

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.2.1: Leadership Competencies. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
13 13 13

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.2.1: Leadership Competencies

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.2.1: Leadership Competencies. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Leadership Competencies learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Leadership Competencies sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:
  • Build key leadership competencies in current and future leaders to strengthen leadership capacity and support a successful transition to the future vision of the public service.
  • Continue to engage with heads of schools of public administration and public policy to explore future collaborative opportunities in support of relevant learning.

Sub-program 1.2.2: Leadership Development Programs

Description: The School, through its Leadership Development Programs sub-program, supports succession planning and renewal within departments and across the public service by providing comprehensive and relevant leadership development products and services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.2.2: Leadership Development Programs

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.2.2: Leadership Development Programs. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
6,843,618 6,844,212 6,845,205

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.2.2: Leadership Development Programs

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.2.2: Leadership Development Programs. The table contains three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
35 35 34

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.2.2: Leadership Development Programs

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.2.2: Leadership Development Programs. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Leadership Development Programs learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Leadership Development Programs sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:
  • Work with client organizations to identify and strengthen the key competencies required of a high-performing, well-connected and adaptable leadership community.
  • Deliver leading-edge learning services designed to equip future leaders to drive and model excellence in public service management.

Sub-program 1.2.3: Leadership Community Building

Description: The School, through its Leadership Community Building sub-program, supports public service leaders through the School's networking and engagement activities, which are designed to address current trends, best practices and emerging issues of strategic importance to the public service.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.2.3: Leadership Community Building

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.2.3: Leadership Community Building. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
943,118 943,148 943,200

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.2.3: Leadership Community Building

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.2.3: Leadership Community Building. The table contains three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
7 7 7

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.2.3: Leadership Community Building

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.2.3: Leadership Community Building. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Leadership Community Building learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Leadership Community Building sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:

  • Strengthen the executive and leadership community through the School's learning and networking services to build leadership capacity and support succession planning within the public service.
  • Fully implement ConnEXion, a leadership community for public service executives. This community offers personalized learning paths. The architecture of the program includes core sessions as well as short interventions on specific topics relevant to the public service.

Program 1.3: Public Sector Management Innovation

Description: The School, through its Public Sector Management Innovation program, enhances the performance and effectiveness of the public service by providing organizations with advisory services related to change management and innovation in public sector management. Two sub-programs support this program:

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 1.3: Public Sector Management Innovation

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Program 1.3: Public Sector Management Innovation. The table is divided into four columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Main Estimates, 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
9,248,810 9,248,810 9,249,550 9,250,791

Human Resources (FTEs) – Program 1.3: Public Sector Management Innovation

Human Resources (FTEs) - Program 1.3: Public Sector Management Innovation. The table contains three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
48 48 46

Performance Measurement – Program 1.3: Public Sector Management Innovation

Performance Measurement - Program 1.3: Public Sector Management Innovation. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Public Sector Management Innovation learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Public Sector Management Innovation program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined under the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:

  • Continue to deliver training designed to support departmental transformation, organizational change management competencies and strong organizational performance.
  • Harness the expertise of existing public service practitioners in the delivery of training with a view to ensuring that managers at all levels receive current and relevant training at the School.
  • Offer customized solutions to meet organizations' learning needs.

Sub-program 1.3.1: Organizational Learning Services

Description: The School, through its Organizational Learning Services sub-program, provides public service organizations with support to develop departmental learning strategies that are aligned with government-wide priorities while ensuring that individual learning needs are optimally addressed with a view to improving performance.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.3.1: Organizational Learning Services

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.3.1: Organizational Learning Services. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
4,865,712 4,866,102 4,866,755

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.3.1: Organizational Learning Services

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.3.1: Organizational Learning Services. The table contains three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
19 19 18

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.3.1: Organizational Learning Services

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.3.1: Organizational Learning Services. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Organizational Learning Services Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Organizational Learning Services sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:

  • Build on applied organizational change management approaches and strategies to assist organizations in meeting their specific learning needs.

Sub-program 1.3.2: Innovative Management Practices

Description: The School, through its Innovative Management Practices sub-program, enhances the School's curriculum through research activities, dialogue and the development of collaborative arrangements with the academic sector on issues related to public sector management.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-program 1.3.2 Innovative Management Practices

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Sub-program 1.3.2: Innovative Management Practices. The table is divided into three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
4,383,098 4,383,448 4,384,036

Human Resources (FTEs) – Sub-program 1.3.2 Innovative Management Practices

Human Resources (FTEs) - Sub-program 1.3.2: Innovative Management Practices. The table contains three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
29 29 28

Performance Measurement – Sub-program 1.3.2 Innovative Management Practices

Performance Measurement - Sub-program 1.3.2: Innovative Management Practices. The table is divided into four columns. Read down the first column for expected results. Read down the second column for performance indicators. Read down the third column for targets. Read down the fourth column for the date each target is to be achieved.
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participants are satisfied with the School's Innovative Management Practices learning activities Percentage of participants assessed who are satisfied with the learning activities 80 percent of participants assessed End of fiscal year

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under the Innovative Management Practices sub-program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined under the Organizational Priorities section.

As part of this sub-program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:

  • Further collaboration and procurement with both the public and private sectors, to support modern approaches to learning related to management practices.

Internal Services

Description: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Internal Services

Budgetary Financial Resources in dollars - Internal Services. The table is divided into four columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15 Main Estimates, 2014-15 Planned Spending, 2015-16 Planned Spending and 2016-17 Planned Spending.
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
23,918,090 23,918,090 23,616,149 23,229,643

Human Resources (FTEs) – Internal Services

Human Resources (FTEs) - Internal Services. The table contains three columns, which are, from left to right: 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
209 205 200

Planning Highlights

Efforts under this program contribute to meeting the School's priorities as outlined in the Organizational Priorities section and support the strategic management of risks identified in the Risk Analysis section.

As part of this program, the School will undertake the following in 2014-15:
  • Advance the School's Strategic Directions initiative to establish the School's priorities for the delivery and management of learning, its programming and its underlying revenue generation.
  • Establish strategies required for implementation of the Strategic Directions initiative.
  • Develop a strategy for the design and implementation of an e-School.
  • Engage School employees to foster innovation and collaboration within the organization.
  • Strengthen the organization's integrated planning and management.
  • Advance efforts to standardize and consolidate the School's internal office systems to increase efficiency and reduce costs, with a focus on common IT applications and end-user devices.
  • Continue to modernize the School's workplace in support of the Clerk of the Privy Council's commitment to workplace renewal.
  • Implement a strategic marketing strategy to improve client engagement and outreach.
  • Work in close collaboration with Public Works and Government Services Canada to achieve savings through Workplace 2.0, Space Recapture and Reduced Office Space Footprint initiatives.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations presented in this subsection is intended to serve as a general overview of the School's operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues are prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the future-oriented statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of this report are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the School's Web siteSchool's Website Link 1. Note de bas de page xiv

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the Year Ended March 31. The first column contains the types of financial information and is divided into three rows containing Total Expenses, Total Revenues and Net Cost of Operations. Select one of the three rows and read to the right for the estimated results for 2013-14, planned results for 2014-15 and the change between them.
Financial information Estimated
Results 2013-14
Planned
Results 2014-15
Change
Total expenses 110,350,856 105,092,971 5,257,885
Total revenues 41,500,000 40,000,000 1,500,000
Net cost of operations 68,850,856 65,092,971 3,757,885

The decrease in expenditures from 2013-14 to 2014-15 is mainly due to the end of immediate cash-out of accumulated severance benefits. The decline in revenue from 2013-14 to 2014-15 is attributable to the end of direct delivery of language training. The positive impact of declining expenditures is a net reduction of the cost of operations from 2013-14 to 2014-15.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014-15 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on the School's Web site. Note de bas de page xv

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication Note de bas de page xvi. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Canada School of Public Service
373 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario  K1N 6Z2
Canada

Telephone: 1-866-703-9598
Fax: 1-866-944-0454
Email: info@csps-efpc.gc.ca
Web site: www.csps-efpc.gc.ca

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